Corneal blood staining

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Corneal blood staining is a severe ophthalmic complication that usually occurs as a result of long-standing hyphema, associated with increased intraocular pressure (IOP)[1].

Disease Entity

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Disease

Corneal blood staining typically occurs after significant and prolonged hyphema, usually the result of ocular trauma, and especially in cases of chronically elevated intraocular pressure. The opacification consists of hemosiderin that has become embedded in the corneal stroma. It can take months, if not years for the cornea to clear, but with patience, it can clear completely. Unfortunately, the periphery clears first followed by the center.

Etiology

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Risk Factors

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General Pathology

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Pathophysiology

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Primary prevention

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Diagnosis

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History

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Physical examination

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Signs

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Symptoms

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Clinical diagnosis

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Diagnostic procedures

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Laboratory test

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Differential diagnosis

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Management

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General treatment

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Medical therapy

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Medical follow up

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Surgery

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Surgical follow up

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Complications

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Prognosis

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Additional Resources

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References

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  1. Krauthammer M, Mandelblum J, Spierer O: Corneal Blood Staining after Complicated Cataract Surgery. Case Rep Ophthalmol 2018;9:421-424. doi: 10.1159/000492612
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